Category: Divorce Paralegal

9 Common Steps to Getting A Divorce

The divorce process in California consists of steps and procedures that carry the case through trial. A divorce is also known as “dissolution of domestic partnership” or “dissolution of marriage.” In California, it is the only way of legally ending a marriage or a domestic relationship.

These are the nine common steps to getting a divorce:

1. Filing and Service of Divorce Petition

The divorce process starts with the filing of a petition for dissolution of marriage and all related forms. Then the court assigns it a case number, and this is the moment where you can say that you officially have an open divorce. It is also the time to serve the petition on your spouse.

2. Responding to the Divorce Petition

The response form is similar to the petition, containing similar requests for the same information. After you complete the response, it is signed and filed with the court of law. Typically, the answer to the petition is mailed to the petitioner or the petitioner’s lawyer.

3. Filing a Request for Temporary Custody and Support Orders

You can submit the request for temporary orders at the same time you file the divorce petition, or afterward. The application for an order can be filed after the response to the petition is filed and served, but it can also happen during the petition procedure. There is no strict timeline for said issues. Depending on circumstances, sometimes it makes more sense to file them at the beginning of the divorce process, and sometimes it is best to do it later.

4. Responding to Requests for Temporary Custody and Managing Attorney Fees

After being served with a request for temporary orders, you need to file a response to the request and provide the court with written declarations that respond to those of your spouse. California law has specific deadlines for submitting your response statement, and it is very dangerous to ignore these deadlines.

In case you don’t have the same ability to pay attorney’s fees as your spouse does, you can use the court to seek contribution from your soon-to-be-ex-spouse.

5. Temporary Custody and Support Hearing

The timeline for the request for order hearing depends on the complexity of the hearing. If you and your spouse are unable to settle the issue before the hearing, spouses are required to testify on the matters where there is no agreement.

6. Declarations of Disclosure

A disclosure consists of necessary forms and other legal documents that disclose to the other spouse all of the property assets, income, expenses, and debts. The preliminary declaration of disclosure has to be served within 60 days of the petition or 60 days from the response to the petition.

7. The Discovery Process

The formal request for information from your spouse is called discovery. It comes in many forms, the most common ones being requests for admissions and deposits, interrogatories, and for the production of documents.

8. Settlements Negotiations

Settlement negotiations typically start after spouses have exchanged their preliminary declaration of disclosure. In most cases, settlement offers are in written forms, from one lawyer to another. Afterward, there are counter offers until the spouses settle.

9. The Trial

The procedure of setting a trial for a divorce case in California varies from each county. Most likely, both sides will have to appear and testify at trial, so it’s best to be prepared by reviewing everything with your attorney.

 

Divorce is never easy, but we can help you ease the experience with the correct paralegal advice. Contact Platinum Paralegals for more information.

Is a Revocable Living Trust Necessary?

A revocable living trust is a legal arrangement to hold ownership of your property throughout the course of your lifetime. The grantor is the creator of the trust and funds his trust with assets. Upon incapacitation or death, the successor trustee and the beneficiaries will receive the benefits of the trust. This living trust avoids probate which is a court-supervised process of dividing a person’s estate. A revocable living trust may be right for you if you would like to avoid probate for your trustee and beneficiaries. There are other scenarios where a revocable trust may be right for you which I will briefly discuss below.

What Does a Revocable Living Trust Do?

A revocable living trust is also sometimes called a living trust and it is a legal document created to hold ownership of an individual’s assets. This trust covers three phases of the trust maker’s  life: his lifetime, possible incapacitation and what happens after death. The person who forms the trust is called the grantor or trust maker but also can serve as the trustee. In most cases, the trustee will form the trust to control and manage the assets he or she placed there until death. Trust makers may also choose to have an attorney or an institution act as a trustee but it is uncommon with this type of trust. A revocable trust is not necessarily permanent so you can change your mind and the trust will be “undone.”

This trust covers three phases of the trust maker’s  life: his lifetime, possible incapacitation and what happens after death.

What Goes Into a Revocable Living Trust?

Thousands of people in California avoid having their estates go through the probate process because they choose to have a revocable living trust. This type of trust is more time and cost effective and it provides people control over their assets. Assets such as stocks, real estate, and bank accounts are all examples of what type of assets go into a revocable living trust. Who you are leaving your assets to should be created with a legal document with your living trust. Not only do you fund this trust with your assets but you also need to name an alternate trustee to manage your assets if you were unable to.

When Is a Revocable Living Trust Needed?

Transferring assets into a living trust can avoid time-consuming and costly court fees by preparing your estate for an easy transition after you die. You do not need to be wealthy to receive the benefits of a revocable living trust, but in some instances, it could be overkill. You can benefit from this type of trust if you own a business because your trustee can manage the business if you incapacitated or die. Also if you are concerned about privacy, a revocable living trust is a private document that doesn’t become a public court record. Only the successor trustees and the beneficiaries you have named may see a copy of your trust. When properly prepared, a living trust can provide for your spouse and children which may be important in second marriages. It saves estate taxes and can protect inheritances for children and grandchildren. If you can relate to any of these factors than you may need a revocable living trust.

Transferring assets into a living trust can avoid time-consuming and costly court fees by preparing your estate for an easy transition after you die.

What Happens to a Revocable Living Trust Upon Death?

Upon death, the successor trustee will step into your role as trustee or grantor of your trust. The beneficiaries you named in your trust documents will inherit from you and they will own the assets you placed in your trust according to the terms you decided when you made it. The assets you placed will not have to go through probate and your successor trustee will disburse your assets. The successor trustee must pay the taxes, debts, and costs of the trust operation from the assets you placed into it. If your successor trustee predeceases you, or if he or she dies before closing your trust, it’s possible your trust could be left unmanaged. States have their own laws on how to address these situations but generally, your heirs would have to have a successor trustee appointed by petitioning the court. Your beneficiaries have the right to suggest themselves or suggest their own choice.

 

 

For low cost, affordable paralegal assistance, call Platinum Paralegals™ at: (818) 839-6879 or send an email to: info@platinumparalegals.com.

Contested Divorce vs Uncontested Divorce

Getting a divorce based on irreconcilable differences doesn’t always mean both parties disagree on how to divide their assets. Fortunately, there is a type of divorce that manages disagreements between spouses so divorce cases are fair for both parties. When both parties disagree on how to divide their assets, this is considered a contested divorce. An uncontested divorce is a divorce where both parties can agree on how to divide their assets. However, even if spouses agree on most things, they may not be suited for an uncontested divorce. Likewise, spouses who disagree on most things way may still be candidates for an uncontested divorce.

What Is a Contested Divorce

In California, spouses should individually be represented in a contested divorce. A contested divorce means neither spouse can agree about getting divorced or the terms of the divorce. The more spouses are unable to agree, the more difficult it is to come to an agreement on how to distribute marital properties and custody of children. This type of divorce can be the most difficult type of divorce and falls into the hands of the court where they will determine the final ruling. In most cases, contested divorce parties will go to mediation to dispute disagreements or go straight to trial. Disagreements can extend the time of the divorce process and create tense relations between the spouses.

What Is an Uncontested Divorce

An uncontested divorce means both parties agree to the divorce terms and cooperate with the divorce process. This type of divorce is less time consuming as it avoids multiple court appearances and lawyer times. These cases can typically be handled by mail or by brief contact with the judge or judge’s clerk. The state of California has certain guidelines and restrictions that help guarantee the parties have truly reached an agreement prior to receiving an uncontested divorce.

Cost of Contested Divorce

There is really no way to predict what a contested divorce in California may cost unless your lawyer charges a flat fee. An example of how costly contested divorce can be is in the city of Los Angeles where contested divorces are approximately $20,000 or higher. Much of the cost depends on how contested the divorce gets and your attorney’s hourly rate. If one or both spouses continue to disagree, the divorce will take longer and significantly impact the cost of the divorce. A case may start out contested, but it can become uncontested if both parties go to mediation or another process to find an agreement.

An example of how costly contested divorce can be is in the city of Los Angeles where contested divorces are approximately $20,000 or higher.

Cost of Uncontested Divorce

You and your spouse can save a great deal of money upon agreeing on everything. An uncontested divorce is much less costly than a contested divorce since it can be handled without court hearings. How much it will cost depends on several factors.  An uncontested divorce with no issues or attorneys can be as low as $500.  If you choose to hire an attorney, it could greatly increase the divorce expenses, especially if they charge by the hour. An uncontested divorce may be as less than one-thirtieth of the cost of a contested divorce, making them more desirable.

 

For low cost, affordable paralegal assistance, call Platinum Paralegals™ at: (818) 839-6879 or send an email to: info@platinumparalegals.com.

What Is Required to Get a Divorce in California?

If you are a California resident who has been served divorce papers or contemplating ending your own marriage, it is important to educate yourself about divorce requirements in California.

Understanding the types of divorce may be in understanding the process. In this article, I will be reviewing each type of divorce but reaching out to an experienced lawyer at Platinum Paralegals can explain each option to you in further detail and go over which one is right for you.

What are Grounds for Divorce?

California is a no-fault divorce state, meaning that you cannot cite any wrongdoing your spouse has committed as a reason for divorce. Although in some cases fault isn’t entirely relevant if your spouse was violent, committed adultery, or abandoned the family and the courts may consider these facts when awarding alimony and dividing property. Most often, the grounds for divorce are “irreconcilable differences” that caused the marriage to break down. California divorce law also allows grounds for divorce if the marriage is legally invalid or one of the parties has a “permanent legal incapacity to make decisions.”

Although in some cases fault isn’t entirely relevant if your spouse was violent, committed adultery, or abandoned the family and the courts may consider these facts when awarding alimony and dividing property.

What Are the Types of Divorce?

When it comes to divorce options in California, there are four different types that can be chosen: no-fault divorce, uncontested divorce, simplified divorce and limited divorce.

No fault divorce essentially means as long as one spouse wants a divorce, the court will grant it. In this type of divorce, there is no reason to show cause or point blame because all it requires is the spouse to cite “irreconcilable differences” with no hope of resolution.

An uncontested divorce is when both parties can agree on everything such as financials, the division of property, and child support. These types of divorce are normally quick and don’t make it to trial because both parties are normally on the same page. Divorces can also be contested, meaning that both parties don’t quite agree with everything which in return could lead all the way up to a full trial if the spouses can’t agree.

Simplified divorce or summary dissolution is a way of ending short-term and uncomplicated marriages. This is an uncontested no-fault divorce where there is no conflict between the spouses but there is a set of conditions that need to be met before being able to file for this type of divorce.

Limited divorce is a court-supervised divorce process that is similar to legal separation.

This option gives both parties time to divide assets and child custody issues before finalizing the divorce. Spouses must live separately from each other or other people and each person’s status remains the same while the marriage is dissolving.

Do I Need to Be a Resident of California to Get a Divorce?

The short answer to this question is yes, but either you or your spouse must have been a California resident for the past six months and have lived a minimum of three months in the county where you plan to file divorce. If you or your spouse do not have residency in a county for at least three months, you can file a divorce with the previous county you lived in. You and your spouse can live separately in different counties and still file for divorce, as long as one or both of you have been residents of the county for at least three months. As long as residency requirements are met, you may obtain a divorce in the state of California.

What is Legal Separation?

A legal separation allows a couple to remain married but live separately. Couples choose this alternative to divorce so they don’t have to end their marriage by dividing their marital assets, financials, or child custody. Some couples may seek legal separation so their spouse does not lose health insurance coverage, or because of religious beliefs. This opportunity allows couples the time to reflect on their marriage before calling it quits.

 

Dogs Getting Married

US Divorce Rate Compared to Other Countries

Divorce may well be one of the most stressful events of a person’s life. Even with the right legal help, divorce is often exhausting mentally, emotionally, and financially. It’s not uncommon to hear pundits discuss the fall of the American family and rise of divorce rates. But how does the United States compare to the rest of the world in terms of divorce rates?

What Is the Divorce Rate in Mexico?

According to this useful map found on Business Insider, as of 2014, the divorce rate in Mexico was between 10 and 19 percent as of 2014. This is substantially lower than many countries across the globe, including the divorce rate in the United States.

On the same map, the United States divorce rate is estimated at between 50 percent and 59 percent. And in 2017, the divorce rate in US vs other countries was perhaps surprisingly low. The United States ranked 12th in terms of divorce rates, with 46 percent of marriages ending in divorce.

Have the Us Divorce Rates Gone Up Over the Past 20 Years?

Man drawing line from ladder

It’s commonly said that divorce is happening with increasing frequency, but is this true? In order find out, it may be helpful to look at the US divorce rate over time for the past 20 years in the United States. As this analysis shows, divorce rates have actually gone slightly down in the past 20 years. In fact, in 2016, divorce rates in the United States reached an almost 40-year low. While divorce rates for the past 20 years have gone down, marriage rates have also gone up.

Which Country Has the Highest Rate of Divorce?

While the US divorce rate over time has been dropping, some other countries have seen an increase in divorce rates for the past 20 years. For those interested in the divorce rate in US vs other countries, in 2017, the United States ranked 12th in the world in terms of percentages of marriages that end in divorce. Despite this, it’s often said that the U.S. has the highest divorce rate in the developed world.

The country with the highest percentage of divorce may surprise you–it is Luxembourg, one of the wealthiest nations in the world. Luxembourg’s divorce rate was 67 percent. Because the wealthy tend to have the financial resources necessary to pursue divorce, it’s possible that divorce cost in other countries (as well as in the United States) may work as a deterrent to poorer citizens who are considering divorce.

Luxembourg’s divorce rate was 67 percent. Because the wealthy tend to have the financial resources necessary to pursue divorce, it’s possible that divorce cost in other countries (as well as in the United States) may work as a deterrent to poorer citizens who are considering divorce.

Which Country Has the Highest Cost for a Divorce?

This leads us to our next topic–what is the divorce cost in other countries? Because of the cost of divorce varies dramatically by state and region, as well as they type of divorce pursued, it is very difficult to determine which nation has the most expensive divorce. For instance, while the United States has had some of the most expensive divorces in history, it is also possible, in the case of a summary divorce, to have a divorce that costs virtually nothing.

If you find yourself in need of a divorce, or if you just want to explore your options, Platinum Paralegals can help. With us, you get excellent legal advice for a fraction of the cost of an attorney’s fee. In addition, because paralegals don’t spend as much time in the courtroom as an attorney does, you don’t need to worry about waiting long hours for your legal representative to call you back. If you are seeking general advice about divorce, or if you’re ready for a case evaluation, get in touch with us via phone or web form today!

Divorce Decree Document

What Is a Summary Dissolution in California?

To the uninitiated, divorce may sound like a one-size-fits-all process. However, depending on the length of time a couple has been married and the complexity of their assets, there may be simpler ways to handle a split. In the state of California, a couple who meets certain requirements may qualify for a summary dissolution, which is a less expensive and less time-consuming process than traditional divorce.

Advantages of a Summary Dissolution Vs a Divorce?

For those asking, “what is a summary dissolution in California?” the main advantage of a summary dissolution is the dramatic reduction in time spent in court, paperwork filed, and court fees. In fact, in some cases, a couple in California who cannot afford filing fees for a dissolution may be eligible for a fee waiver.

Because there are so few shared assets and no child custody decisions to be made in a summary dissolution, the time between filing and a final, legal end to a marriage is shorter. This is because, in more complex divorce situations, time must be spent in and out of court deciding on child custody and the splitting of assets. The time needed to do so may be even greater in the event of a contested divorce, or when the parties have different ideas of who should receive what.

For those asking, “what is a summary dissolution in California?” the main advantage of a summary dissolution is the dramatic reduction in time spent in court, paperwork filed, and court fees. In fact, in some cases, a couple in California who cannot afford filing fees for a dissolution may be eligible for a fee waiver.

What Are the Requirements for a Summary Dissolution?

If you find yourself asking “What is a summary dissolution in California?” the first step is looking at what is required to qualify for this option. While the requirements are somewhat stringent, they are likely to apply to young, relatively poor, or recently married couples. Requirements for a summary dissolution California include the following:

1.The marriage has lasted five or fewer years
2.Neither member of the couple has any children
3.Neither member is pregnant
4.Neither member owns land or buildings
5.The couple’s community property (excluding vehicles) is worth under $43,000
6.Neither member has separate property (excluding vehicles) worth over $43,000
7.The couple’s total community obligations (excluding vehicles) is $6,000 or less

What Are the Requirements for a Divorce?

If you’re asking, “What are the requirements for a divorce?” you may be relieved to know that, unlike the requirements for a summary dissolution, the requirements for a divorce in California are much less stringent than those for a summary dissolution.

Generally speaking, the only requirements to initiate divorce proceedings are that the couple legally resides in California and is married. In order to establish legal residency in the state, the couple must have lived in California for at least six months.

How Much Is the Cost of a Summary Dissolution in California?

How much concept.

Because the process is much less arduous than that of divorce, the cost of summary dissolution in California is much less than the cost of divorce. The exact cost may depend on a few factors, including the county in which the couple is located and whether or not they seek legal counsel. However, as noted above, if the couple is unable to pay, the cost of summary dissolution in California may be waived entirely.

If you are considering ending your marriage and believe you may qualify for a summary dissolution, Platinum Paralegals can help. For a fraction of the cost of consulting with an attorney, you can receive expert legal guidance that will expedite the process. Ending a marriage is rarely easy, but the right legal guidance can at least help make it more simple. Get in touch with Platinum Paralegals today!

Divorce word blob

Differences Between an Anulment Vs a Divorce?

To those unfamiliar with the law and how it relates to marriage, it may seem as though a divorce and an annulment are similar things. However, there are important differences between the two, and each couple’s situation will help determine whether they should pursue divorce or annulment. But first, an understanding of these different terms is necessary.

What Is an Annulment?

Legally speaking, an annulment means that a marriage has been declared null and void by the court. Unlike a divorce, which is the legal dissolution of a marriage, an annulment means that, in the eyes of the law, a marriage never even happened. Not all marriages are eligible for this, however. Those asking “What is an annulment?” may be surprised to find that there are a few annulment requirements, which are detailed below.

What Is a Divorce?

In an uncontested divorce, the couple works together to determine divorce terms. This means that the proceedings are generally faster than they would be if the couple needs to spend more time in court. Additionally, uncontested divorce offers considerable savings on attorney fees. While attorneys aren’t required for divorce, legal representation is recommended.

Couples may want to opt for paralegal help in the event of uncontested divorce. This means that they still can receive legal guidance, but for a fraction of the cost of an attorney’s help. By contrast, a contested divorce involves more money and time, as couples who choose this option often disagree over the division of assets, child custody, etc.

Couples may want to opt for paralegal help in the event of uncontested divorce. This means that they still can receive legal guidance, but for a fraction of the cost of an attorney’s help. By contrast, a contested divorce involves more money and time, as couples who choose this option often disagree over the division of assets, child custody, etc.

Requirements for an Annulment

Compared to the requirements for a divorce, requirements for annulment are somewhat stringent. When considering an annulment vs divorce, a couple may want to consider whether their marriage meets annulment requirements.

For a marriage to be declared null and void, the party initiating the divorce needs to prove that one member of the couple was already married to another person during the marriage in question.

The marriage was forced or prohibited by law, or that one member of the couple was emotionally disturbed or mentally ill at the time of the marriage and therefore could not consent to it.

Additionally, if the marriage involves someone who is underage or otherwise unable to legally consent, the marriage can be annulled. If fraud was involved or if there was an inability to consummate the marriage, it may also be declared null. Each state may also have additional requirements for determining whether a marriage can be nullified as well.

Requirements for a Divorce

Sad divorced wife

In trying to determine whether an annulment vs divorce is most appropriate, it may be helpful to remember that, in many cases, divorce is the option chosen for the dissolution of a marriage. While the requirements for pursuing this option may vary depending on where you are.

In California, in order to legally file for divorce, the couple must meet residency requirements, meaning that they must have lived in the state for at least six months prior to filing. After that, the couple and/or their legal counsel can work on determining the best filing option.

Divorce and annulment are often challenging topics to navigate, but the right legal guidance can help those facing the dissolution of marriage to make the right choices and lead happier lives. If you are in need of legal assistance, contact Platinum Paralegals today!

 

What Is the Difference Between a Legal Separation and Divorce?

Most couples enter into marriage under the assumption that it will be forever. Unfortunately, any number of circumstances can arise that make it impossible for the parties to remain together. When this occurs, the couple typically files for a legal separation or a divorce. Common questions from couples considering either of these options include:

What Is the Difference Between a Legal Separation and a Divorce in California?

Couples typically file for legal separation when they no longer want to live together in the marital home but they are not yet ready to officially dissolve the marriage. A legal separation decree outlines the rights and duties of both parties while living apart; however, they do remain married.

Couples may also consider legal separation if they do not meet California’s six-month residency requirement for filing divorce. Since there is no residency requirement for filing for legal separation, a couple can file as soon as they move to California, which allows them to be considered separate for tax and other financial purposes, and then convert the separation to a divorce after six months.

Divorce Papers

What Are the Requirements for a Legal Seperation?

California is a “no-fault” state, which means that you do not have to prove that your spouse did anything wrong in order to file for a legal separation. The responding spouse must either agree to the separation or default by failing to respond to the petition. The actual process for filing is very similar to a divorce. A petition is filed, the parties disclose their finances and other assets to the court, and the parties either reach a settlement agreement or the court decides financial, property, and custody issues during a trial. The court then enters a decree of separation specifying each spouse’s rights and obligations during the separation.

Request a Free Consultation with Platinum Paralegals >

Is a Legal Separation Reversible?

A couple can reverse a legal separation by filing a Motion to Vacate Order of Legal Separation. The parties will need to explain that they have never filed or received a divorce and that they have reconciled.

How Does a Legal Separation Protect You?

A decree of legal separation addresses many of the same issues as a divorce decree, including spousal and child support, child custody and visitation arrangements, and the division of any property.

A decree of legal separation addresses many of the same issues as a divorce decree, including spousal and child support, child custody and visitation arrangements, and the division of any property.

How Does a Legal Separation Protect You Financially?

A legal separation may offer financial protection to both spouses. If spousal support is included in the agreement, the spouse who is paying may be able to claim the payments as a tax deduction. The agreement can specify that a spouse who is covered under the other spouse’s health insurance is to remain covered during the separation. The agreement can also outline who is responsible for certain debts and set limits on spending from joint accounts. If you have not been married for 10 years, you can separate and delay divorcing until you reach the 10-year mark in order to draw from your spouse’s social security benefits when you reach 62.

What Is the Cost of a Legal Separation in California?

The actual cost of a legal separation can vary depending on the complexity of the issues to be resolved. Contact Platinum Paralegals today to arrange a consultation.

divorce paralegal los angeles

Divorce Paralegal Los Angeles

Why Choose a Divorce Paralegal Over a Lawyer?

If you find yourself in need of legal services for a divorce, you may be concerned about the potential cost of hiring a lawyer. Not everyone knows about the lower-cost alternative: hiring a paralegal. However, if you are considering paralegal divorce services Los Angeles, you may be wary of hiring a professional who is not an attorney.
You may be surprised to hear that hiring a divorce paralegal in Los Angeles gives you many of the same benefits of hiring a lawyer, and it also comes with a few unique features
You may be surprised to hear that hiring a divorce paralegal in Los Angeles gives you many of the same benefits of hiring a lawyer, and it also comes with a few unique features. Below, we’ll examine some of the possible reasons you might want to hire a paralegal at the Divorce Center of Los Angeles paralegal services to handle your divorce proceedings. Below, we’ll look into why you may want to hire a paralegal to assist you with legal separation or divorce.

A Divorce Paralegal in Los Angeles May Be More Accessible to You

While attorneys are often chosen by those pursuing divorce in Los Angeles, they need to spend long hours in the courtroom where they will be inaccessible by phone or e-mail. Paralegals, on the other hand, perform many of the same preparation duties as lawyers do, but they aren’t required to also spend significant amounts of time in the courtroom. This means that when you work with a paralegal, you will likely be able to reach them much more easily by e-mail, phone, or both.

At the Platinum Paralegals Divorce Center of Los Angeles paralegal services, you can call or e-mail at any time, since paralegals are available to assist you 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If your case is urgent or if you simply prefer to have your questions answered quickly without having to wait for a callback once your lawyer is out of the courtroom for the day, paralegal divorce services Los Angeles may well be the best option for you.

Paralegals Perform Many of the Same Duties As Lawyers

Paralegals aren’t required to undergo as much training as lawyers are, but they typically have extensive legal experience, particularly when it comes to the preparation of legal documents. This is because at larger firms, paralegals often handle research, writing reports, and other important details of cases. Thus, divorce paralegal services Los Angeles are often staffed by paralegals with training and experience specific to divorce, separation, and related situations. Because Platinum Paralegals handles a large volume of cases, you will be working with a network of professionals who have likely seen cases similar to yours.

Paralegals Rates Are More Affordable

Because paralegals require less schooling and don’t have the same licensing requirements as attorneys do, hiring a divorce paralegal Los Angeles is significantly less expensive than hiring a lawyer to do the same work. If you are short on money or end up needing a divorce on short notice, a divorce paralegal in Los Angeles can efficiently and professionally handle your case while potentially saving you thousands. And since Platinum Paralegals will beat any competitor’s advertised price for legal services, you are guaranteed to get quality service for an excellent rate.

Divorce and legal separation are often extremely stressful events. Having quality legal services offered at an affordable rate may help mitigate some of the stress associated with divorce. When you choose a divorce paralegal Los Angeles, you receive faster answers to questions and also work with someone with experience handling cases like yours. If you’re in need of legal services for your divorce or legal separation, contact Platinum Paralegals for a case review today.